WARRIOR WEAR

 

BRONZE AGE ON THE EURASIAN STEPPE SECTIONS:

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“LAND OF THE LURS”: INTRODUCTION TO THE CIMMERIANS

Luristan (or Lorestan) literally means “Land of the Lurs”, and was situated in a wide sweep of the Zagros mountains in what is now western Iran. The sociopolitics of this area are complex, with repeated waves and invasions of Medes, Cimmerians and Persians, amongst others, but the culture thus created is remarkable for its superb control of metalworking. There are many styles, but the best-known pieces of bronze from this area are anthropomorphic and zoomorphic pieces reflecting religious and secular tastes, as well as weaponry and utilitarian items that were buried with the deceased in tombs across the Zagros area. It was nonetheless viewed as a precious resource, and was used alongside iron once this metal became available, for while its qualities of hardness and durability were recognized, it merely made bronze a more socially exclusive material. The hallmark of Luristan wares is the tendency to elongate the necks, tails and bodies of the animals to produce graceful curves and arches. Read More 

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GREAVES

Worn by heavy infantry, greaves were an important part of the Bronze Age European weaponry. Greek hoplites wore bronze greaves to protect their legs. Located mostly in rich graves of chieftains or warriors, similar greaves were found in eastern Illyria (present-day Albania) as well as in Thrace (present-day Bulgaria.

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BRONZE SWORD

The origins of early bronze swords are shrouded in human prehistory. Swords were deadly tools of combat used by nomadic warriors sweeping through space like a perfect war machine. The origin of this sword is unclear, but its design displays Iranian (Lorestan) and Asiatic design elements.

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FIRE PAN

In antiquity, a fire pan was used as a source of light and/or heat. Suspended on chains, fire pans served as lanterns on ancient ships as well as heating devices similar to braziers. Scythians may have used fire pans for breathing hemp fumes, a custom described by Herodotus. In his Histories, Herodotus reports the use of hemp in Scythia both for weaving cloth and for purification rituals during funerals. The use of hemp at funereal rituals was confirmed by archaeological finds.

This fire pan is decorated with finely crafted silver figurines of Cupids suggesting its Greek or Roman origin.

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IMAGE CITATION:

1. Greaves, 9th-7th centuries B.C.

Bronze: hammering, embossing

2. Greaves, 9th-7th centuries B.C.

Bronze: hammering, embossing

3. Axe-Mattock, 900-800 B.C.

Bronze: casting, sharpening

4. Sword, 10-8th centuries B.C.

Bronze: molding, hammering

5.  Sword,  8th-7th centuries B.C.

Bronze: molding, hammering

6. Fire Pan, 7th-2nd centuries B.C.

 

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Next Section: Bronze Age Finials