America’s First Vasili Nechitailo Solo Exhibition Opens Sept. 3 at the Museum of Russian Art

PLEASE NOTE:  The Ukrainian Antiquities exhibition originally scheduled for the fall of 2010 has been postponed until October 1, 2011.

Titled “The Art of Vasili Nechitailo,” the exhibition is Part 2 in TMORA’s series “Discovering 20th Century Russian Masters”

MINNEAPOLIS – The Museum of Russian Art (TMORA) today announces the exhibition THE ART OF VASILI NECHITAILO, America’s first solo exhibition of paintings by Russian artist Vasili Nechitailo (1915 – 1980).  Scheduled to open Friday, September 3, the exhibition is Part 2 of TMORA’s Discovering 20th Century Russian Masters series.  Part 1 of the series, “Raising the Banner: The Art of Geli Korzhev,” was named 2007’s Best Art Exhibition of the Year by Minneapolis/St. Paul Magazine.

On display through February 27, 2011, the exhibition includes 60 paintings spanning Nechitailo’s remarkable career, and marks the first and only individual showing of Nechitailo’s works outside of Russia.  Samples of Vasili Nechitailo’s work have previously been exhibited at the State Tretyakov Gallery in Moscow, the State Russian Museum in St. Petersburg and the Smithsonian International Gallery in Washington D.C.

“The exhibition will introduce visitors to a comprehensive body of work from an influential and important Russian painter from the mid-20th century,” said Judi Dutcher, TMORA Director.  “Vasili Nechitailo’s mastery of color and light is evident in his works. His brushwork is magnificent, offering insightful depictions of everyday life.”

Born in a village in the Kuban region of southern Russia, the artist was a member of the USSR Academy of Arts, and held the honorary title of People’s Artist of the Russian Soviet Republic. Vasili Nechitailo was recognized for his remarkable artistic style; his innate sense of color and unique color solutions were acclaimed by his fellow artists and as well as art critics. Throughout his career, his native Kuban retained an irresistible fascination for him and he frequently traveled from Moscow to southern Russia to portray the vastness of freshly ploughed fields and the dazzling golden mountains of harvested wheat shoveled by sun burnt collective farmers. His bold and lavish brushstrokes are highly expressive and the interplay of pictorial elements often dominates the subject matter.  Nechitailo’s great mastery in conveying spontaneous and unsentimental beauty through the virtuoso use of paint has made him one of the most renowned Russian artists of the 20th century.

The exhibition will reveal the unique features of the Russian school of painting, known for its attention to paint quality, vigorous and sumptuous brushwork, the dense application of paint, and the meticulous study of nature en plein aire. The key point of the Russian school was its emphasis on the ‘training of the eye’ of the artist in order to discern the interactions and reflections of color found in nature and the ability to translate these color schemes into the language of paints. The training of Russian/Soviet artists was rigorous and thorough. During their school years young artists learned methods and acquired skills that are seldom encountered in contemporary art instruction.

 

Comments are closed.